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A global silence – a critical interpretive synthesis of Aboriginal mothering through domestic and family violence.

Abstract: Aboriginal women globally face extreme risk of violence and their exposure to domestic and family violence (DFV) and state sanctioned violence is increasing. Attention to the impact on Aboriginal mothering is lacking and is underpinned by issues of social justice. This study employs Critical Interpretive Synthesis to examine the evidence on Aboriginal mothering through DFV. Serrant-Green’s Silences Framework was used to structure the critique, understand its problematics and generate an argument to counter the evidential silence. From 6,117 search results, ten publications were reviewed, only four of which substantially addressed Aboriginal mothering in the context of family and domestic violence; a conspicuous absence from the literature about Aboriginal women, children, and mothering. Studies addressing Aboriginal women’s experience of DFV did not credit the issue of mothering. Equally, studies that did address mothering through violence were generally not inclusive of Aboriginal women. Silence, therefore, sits at the nexus of DFV, Aboriginal women, and mothering. While violence against Aboriginal women is acknowledged as a social ill, inattention to mothering in research represents a disregard for Aboriginal women’s mothering identities and roles. Aboriginal women’s voice and citizenship are critical to addressing this issue.

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Researchers: A/Prof Shawana Andrews, Prof Cathy Humphreys, A/Prof Bridget Hamilton

Year: 2021

Citation: Andrews, S., Humphreys, C. & Hamilton, B. (2021) A global silence – a critical interpretive synthesis of Aboriginal mothering through domestic and family violence. Affilia, Journal of Women and Social Work, DOI: 10.1177/08861099211055520 10

Participatory practice guideline development at the intersections of domestic and family violence, mental distress and/or parental substance use.

Abstract:

It is well established that the service system has a poor history of responding holistically to address the needs of children and families living with co-occurring complexities such as domestic violence, parental mental health and/or substance use. The purpose of this conceptual paper is to primarily describe the developmental process used to create guidelines to inform practice at the intersections of domestic violence, mental health and alcohol and other drug services, ensuring that the tactics of coercive control are visible in contexts of complexity.

Practice-led research engaged practitioners in the development of guidelines to promote an integrated response to working with families experiencing domestic violence, substance use and mental health issues. The integrated approach drew from the Safe & Together model, emphasising partnering with women survivors, pivoting to the perpetrator, focusing on children’s safety and well-being, promoting worker safety, collaborating across agencies and influencing organisational change. The process demonstrated the usefulness of this integrated approach, using practitioner-based examples.

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Researchers:

A/Prof Susan Lynn Heward-Belle, Dr Margaret Kertesz, Prof Cathy Humphreys, A/Prof Menka Tsantefski, Jasmin Isobe

Year:

2022

Citation:

Heward-Belle, S., Kertesz, M., Humphreys, C., Tsantefeski, M. & Isobe, J. (2022). Participatory practice guideline development at the intersections of domestic and family violence, mental distress and/or parental substance use. Advances in Dual Diagnosis, 15, 51-65 https://www.emerald.com/insight/content/doi/10.1108/ADD-12-2021-0017/full/html

DAHLIA-19 Australian Case Study

Abstract:

Situated against this background of changes to the family law context is the National Covid-19 List. The Australian mapping report for the DAHLIA-19 study found that a major innovative change that took place in response to the Covid-19 pandemic was a rapid shift from face-to-face practice to tele-practice and online/working-from-home models (McKibbin et al., 2021). The National Covid-19 List, established on 29 April 2020 by the then Family Court of Australia and Federal Circuit Court of Australia, represents a landmark shift in how urgent family law matters are addressed and progressed, with the transition to an online model giving rise to a new possibility of managing these matters centrally. This critical shift allowed the Courts, for the first time, to allocate resources where they were required nationally, and not be beholden to allocations per state and territory.

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Researchers: Sijnja, J., Robinson, M., Humphreys, C., McKibbin, G.

Year: 2022

Citation: Sijnja, J., Robinson, M., Humphreys, C., & McKibbin, G. (2022). The National Covid-19 List: An Australian case study. Australia’s National Research Organisation for Women’s Safety.

KODY. An all-of-family response to co-occurring substance use and domestic violence: protocol for a quasi-experimental intervention trial.

Abstract:

This study aims to build on the existing evidence by trialling the KODY program which addresses harmful substance use by men who also perpetrate domestic violence; the safety and wellbeing of women and children; the needs of children in their own right, as well as in relationship with their mothers; and the development of an ‘all-of-family’ service response. The evaluation of these innovations, and the ramifications for policy development to support less fragmented service system responses, provide the rationale for the study.

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Authors: Dr Margaret Kertesz, Prof Cathy Humphreys, Larissa Fogden, Dr Katreena Scott, Dr Anne-Marie Laslett & Dr Menka Tsantefski

Year: 2022

Citation: Kertesz, M., Humphreys, C., Fogden, L., Scott., Laslett, A-M. & Tsantefski, M. (2022) KODY, an all-of-family response to co-occurring substance use and domestic violence: protocol for a quasi-experimental intervention trial. BMC Open, 291  https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-022-12529-x

“Never waste a crisis”: Domestic and family violence policy and practice initiatives in response to COVID-19 (DAHLIA-19)

Abstract:

This report describes the activities undertaken in 2020-21 by the University of Melbourne with Kids First and Odyssey Across the world, the risks of experiencing DFV have increased due to restrictions put in place to slow the spread of COVID-19. While a number of policy initiatives and innovative practices have emerged to address these heightened risks, not much is known about their impact. ANROWS and the University of Melbourne have been working in partnership on DAHLIA-19, an international research study exploring domestic and family violence service provision – and in particular, innovative practice – in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. The research has taken place in Australia, the United Kingdom, Ireland and South Africa, and is funded by the UKRI’s Economic and Social Research Council. This report looks broadly at Australian initiatives that were implemented during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic up until June 2021 highlighting innovations and practices within the sector and considerations for policy and practice moving forward.

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Researchers: McKibbin, G., Humphreys, C., Gallois, E., Robinson, M., Sijnja, J., Yeung, J. & Goodbourn, R. 

Year: 2021

Citation: McKibbin, G., Humphreys, C., Gallois, E., Robinson, M., Sijnja, J., Yeung, J. & Goodbourn, R. (2021) AUSTRALIAN COUNTRY REPORT “Never waste a crisis”: Domestic and family violence policy and practice initiatives in response to COVID-19 (DAHLIA-19) Sydney: ANROWS

Kertesz, M., Fogden, L. and Humphreys, C. (2021) The KODY Project: Report on the development of an all-of-family intervention at the intersections of DFV and AOD. Melbourne: University of Melbourne.

Abstract:

This report describes the activities undertaken in 2020-21 by the University of Melbourne with Kids First and Odyssey House Victoria to develop KODY, an all-of-family intervention at the intersections of DFV and AOD. These activities were supported by a Learning Systems Grant Report for the Centre for Excellence in Child and Family Welfare. The report includes an overview of the practice-research partnership, achievements of the KODY Project, the program theory of change, marketing materials and outcomes evaluation measures.

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Researchers: Kertesz, M., Fogden, L. and Humphreys, C.

Year: 2021

Australia’s National Research Organisation for Women’s Safety. (2020). Safe & Together Addressing ComplexitY for Children (STACY for Children): Key findings and future directions (Research to policy and practice, 22/2020). Sydney: ANROWS.

Abstract:

The “STACY for Children” project was conducted across three research sites in Queensland, New South Wales and Victoria by a collaborative, multi-disciplinary team of researchers. The project involved two studies that investigated whether there was emerging evidence that the Safe & Together™ Model (S&T Model), where it is implemented holistically (with
an authorising environment and strong collaborative practice), leads to better outcomes for children and families living with DFV and parental issues of AOD and/or MH.

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Researchers: Humphreys, C., Parolini, A., Healey, L., Kertesz, M., Tsantefski, M., Heward-Belle, S., O’Leary, P., Isobe, J., Tan, W. W., Jeffreys, C., Bornemisza, A., Young, A., Fogden, L.

Year: 2020

Humphreys, C., Kertesz, M., Parolini, A., Isobe, J., Heward-Belle, S., Tsantefski, M., … Healey, L. (2020). Safe & Together Addressing ComplexitY for Children (STACY for Children) (Research report, 22/20). Sydney: ANROWS.

Abstract:

The STACY for Children project (2019–20) involved two
studies that investigated whether there was emerging evidence
that the Safe & Together™ Model, where it is implemented
holistically, is leading to better outcomes for children and
families living with domestic and family violence (DFV)
and parental issues of alcohol and other drugs (AOD) use
and/or mental health (MH) problems.

Study 1 focused on listening to the voices of those working and
living at the intersection of DFV, AOD and MH. Researchers
gathered perspectives from practitioners and from clients from
participating organisations about the implementation of an
all-of-family approach to practice (i.e. each family member
receiving attention or a service at intake).

Study 2 explored the implementation of the Safe & Together
(S&T) approach in a particular trial site where a specialist
worker is placed to support and inform the child protection
process from a DFV-informed perspective. It used child
case-level, de-identified administrative records to investigate
whether the availability of the S&T Model as an approach to
practice was associated with positive outcomes for children and
families in an area where it had been proactively implemented.

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Researchers: Humphreys, C., Parolini, A., Healey, L., Kertesz, M., Tsantefski, M., Heward-Belle, S., O’Leary, P., Isobe, J., Tan, W. W., Jeffreys, C., Bornemisza, A., Young, A., Fogden, L.

Year: 2020

Kertesz, M., Humphreys, C. & Larance, L.Y. (2021). Interventions for women who use force in a family context: an Australian Practice Framework. Melbourne: University of Melbourne.

Abstract:

This Practice Framework isdesigned as a brief guide for practitioners and program designers to the principles and intervention style deemed essential for working with this population. It is best read in the context of a program curriculum such as the Positive Shift Curriculum or the University of Melbourne research reports on this topic.

The framework is based on a research program about women who use force in a family context, which has included academic researchers from the University of Melbourne and Curtin University and service providers and users (Baptcare and Berry Street).

Researchers: Kertesz, M., Humphreys, C. & Larance, L.Y.

Year: 2021

Warren, A., Martin, R., Chung, D. (2020) Women who use force: Final Report. Volume 3 – National Workforce Survey. Melbourne: University of Melbourne

Abstract:

This is the final report (3 volumes) of a research program that has developed the Australian knowledge base about women who use force in a family context, and appropriate service responses. The research was funded by the Department of Social Services.

Volume 3 reports on a national workforce survey which found varying understandings and definitions of what constitutes women’s use of force and the extent to which it is considered different from men. The report identifies that there is some urgency in building knowledge about this area of work, as women who use force are seen regularly by study participants in their work.

Researchers: Warren, A., Martin, R., Chung, D.

Year: 2020